Undergraduate Retreat

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: UNDERGRADUATE FORESTRY RETREAT
Undergraduate Forestry Professional Development & Leadership Skills Retreat

What communication, collaboration and leadership skills are important in forestry or other natural resources professions? Join us for the second annual Forestry Undergraduate retreat in which we will identify and develop skills and strategies you can use throughout your career.

The purpose of this retreat is to explore topics related to leadership skills in a wide variety of forestry professions. The retreat will include large and small-group sessions focused on instruction and dialog about leadership and professional development topics. There will be opportunities for recreation (canoeing, swimming and hiking) near the retreat center.

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WHEN
2016 date TBA

WHO
OPEN to all undergraduate Forestry Majors & Minors
REQUIRED for all Forests Forever Scholars

WHERE
The retreat will be held at the DNR Ralph A. MacMullen Conference Center in Roscommon, MI, on the shores of scenic Higgins Lake.

COST
All expenses (transportation, lodging, meals) will be covered by the Department of Forestry.

MORE INFORMATION
Lesley Schumacher-Lott, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Dr. Jessica Miesel, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Watch for more information at the beginning of Fall Semester.

Online Forestry Courses

The MSU Department of Forestry offers two online course options: Michigan’s Forests (FOR 101) and Introduction to Forestry (FOR 202). Anyone can enroll in these courses. MSU students enroll as they would enroll for a traditional course.  Online courses can be found in the Schedule of Courses by clicking the “Online courses” icon under Location. If you are not an MSU student and would like to take one of these courses, you should apply to the university as a Lifelong Education student.

Following are more details about each online Forestry course.

Michigan’s Forests (FOR 101)
Many of you have interests in our state’s forests; you may live, fish, hunt, recreate, or work in or near them. Though you may be familiar with some aspects of Michigan’s forests from your experiences, you may want to know more about a broader array of topics. This course is designed to help you learn some interesting facts about the history and present status of our forests.  From the return of forests after glaciation to the multiple uses of our forests today.

The course covers the ecological, social, and economic roles of Michigan’s forests in a historic and contemporary context. You will learn how to identify many common Michigan trees and some unique forested areas from southeast Michigan to the western Upper Peninsula.

Instructor: Dr. Larry Leefers (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))

Credits: 3

Date: 1/11/16 - 4/29/16

Text: Dickmann, D.I., and L.A. Leefers. 2003. The Forests of Michigan. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press. 297 p. Second Printing. Retail price: $35.00.

 

Introduction to Forestry (FOR 202)
This is a great course for anyone interested in an introduction to our forest resources including teachers, private woodlot owners and Scout leaders as well as students from any major.

The course introduces fundamental concepts of forests and forest management including tree biology, tree identification, forest ecology, silvicultural management systems for multiple forest objectives (e.g. recreation, wildlife, watersheds and nontimber forest products), forest harvesting, and forest protection. The course includes field exercises as well as a field trip. 

Instructor: Dr. Maureen McDonough (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))

Credits: 3

Date: 7/6/15 - 8/20/15

Text: None

Important Information for Graduate Applicants

  1. GETTING STARTED – The most important thing to do is communicate with faculty members that you would like to work with.  No one is admitted to our graduate programs without a willing advisor.  So look over the webpages/research interest of potential faculty advisors, read some of their recent papers, and contact those you may be interested in having as your advisor.
  2. GRE SCORES – GRE scores are required for admission to our MS and PhD programs. These scores must be sent directly from the GRE Scoring Office to MSU. Use institution code – 1465 and department code – 0108
  3. TOEFL.  English language proficiency must be demonstrated for applicants from non English speaking countries. For the TOEFL, MSU requires that applicants have an average of 80 or higher. Furthermore, individual Speaking, Listening, and Reading subscores must be 19 or higher, and the Writing subscore must be 22 or higher.  TOEFL scores must be sent directly from the TOEFL Scoring Office to MSU. Use institution code – 1465 and department code – 99.
  4. TRANSCRIPTS – MSU will only accept ‘Official Transcripts’ this means they must come directly from the university in a sealed and stamped envelope.  Some universities have the ability to electronically submit transcripts this is also acceptable.  Transcripts should be sent directly to:

    Michigan State University
    Department of Forestry
    Attn: Graduate Secretary
    480 Wilson Rd., Rm. 126
    Natural Resources Building
    East Lansing, MI  48824

    You can upload your transcript on the MSU Graduate Admissions Management System (GAMS) but your application will not be considered complete until the ‘official transcript’ has been received.

    All transcripts must be degree-granting transcripts.  This means if you are in your last semester and have the transcript sent it will not show the final grades for that semester, therefore it indicates that your degree has not been completed. Before starting your program at MSU we must receive the ‘degree granting’ transcript indicating that you have passed all required course work and completed your degree.
  5. LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION – The recommendation letters can be uploaded on the MSU Graduate Admissions Management System (GAMS) website or sent directly to:

 

Michigan State University
Department of Forestry
Attn: Graduate Secretary
480 Wilson Rd., Rm. 126
Natural Resources Building
East Lansing, MI  48824

 

 

Apply Now

Apply for admission to the Department of Forestry by following these steps:

  • Complete an online application at http://admissions.msu.edu/apply.asp  (select Undergraduate, Graduate, or Graduate Certificate from the drop box selection)
  • Pay the $50 nonrefundable application fee by credit card
  • Send appropriate official documentation to the locations described below

Official Documents

GRE and TOEFL
Guidelines

GRE: (Institution Code: 1465, Department Code: 0108)

TOEFL (International students only): If English is a second language, take the TOEFL or IELTS exam and have scores sent to the MSU Graduate School. The institution code for MSU is 1465. For all guidelines related to international students, please see MSU International Application Instructions.

Submission
Electronic copies should be sent to the Michigan State University Office of Admissions at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Hard copies should be sent to:

Hannah Administration Building
426 Auditorium Road, Room 250
East Lansing, Michigan 48824-2604
Telephone: (517) 355-8332
Fax: (517) 353-1647

Official Transcripts

Guidelines

Official, sealed transcripts must be in English and sent directly from your learning institution. These can be sent electronically directly from your institution.

Submission

Electronic copies should be sent to Juli Mack in the MSU Department of Forestry at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hard copies to:

Department of Forestry
Juli K. Kerr, Office Manager
480 Wilson Rd., Rm. 126
East Lansing, MI  48824-1222

MSU Forestry Alumni Photos

The following photo collection was submitted by Jerry Gildemeister, MSU Forestry Alumn ‘55. The images were taken between 1952-1954.

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Undergraduate Forestry Courses

FOR 101  Michigan’s Forests

FOR 110 Seminar on Contemporary Issues in Forests and the Environment

FOR 204 Forest Vegetation

FOR 222 Forestry Field Methods

FOR 404 Forest Ecology

FOR 406 Applied Forest Ecology: Silviculture

FOR 414 Renewable Wood Products

Graduate Students

MSU Extension

Michigan is home to 20 million acres of forestland, making it one of the ten most forested states. Forty percent of those forests are owned by more than 400,000 individuals and families. Michigan’s forests support more than 125,000 jobs and contribute more than $17 billion to Michigan’s economy annually. MSU Extension forestry programs help landowners become effective stewards, managing their forests for today while preserving those benefits for future generations. MSU educators and researchers also work to increase skills and capacity of state natural resources agencies, landowner organizations and the forest industry. Visit MSU Extension

Staff

Emeritus Faculty

Adjunct Faculty

Faculty

Postdoctoral Scholars

Forestry Alumni Profile

Question & Answer with Tricia Mitchell (B.S., ‘07)

Tricia is currently a forester in Indian River with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources - Forest Resources Division.

What was your first job after forestry school?
I was hired out of college for a seasonal position in Montana as an inventory forest technician, which turned into year-round employment split between forest inventory and timber sale prep.

How did you decide to major in Forestry?
Larry Leefers and Don Dickman are the two reasons I decided to major in forestry. If you’ve had the pleasure of meeting either of them, you’ll understand how they turned me to the department. Their knowledge, enthusiasm, and passion for forestry roped me in. I took an introductory forestry course my freshman year (co-instructed by Dr. Dickman and Dr. Leefers) and decided then and there to switch from pre-dental to forestry. I also owe a lot of credit to my parents for exposing me to the joys of camping and hiking, and for giving me the freedom to get lost in the woods nearby their house.

What books have you read this year?
I’ve read a lot of scientific publications, especially concerning hardwood management practices and anything to do with ash and beech mortality…
Aside from that, I’ve spent some time re-reading some favorites: The Nothing That Is and the Nothing That Is Not by Steven Carter (the scholar, not the self-help author), Ultramarathon Man by Dean Karnazes, Cradle of Forestry in America by C. A. Schenck, Born to Run by Christopher McDougall, among others.

Describe a challenging professional decision or circumstance
The biggest challenge I find in my daily work is managing for multiple resources. It’s a struggle that every environmental discipline will (and certainly does) face. The benefit to being co-managers (that is, working with Fisheries, Wildlife, and Recreation divisions) is that in reaching compromises between our agendas, the result is a balanced management regime on a broader (ecosystem) scale. The challenge is in having the professional flexibility and humility to sometimes concede to wildlife management (or recreation, fisheries, etc.) over forest, yet also knowing when to maintain a firm stance on silvicultural needs. Respecting other land managers and valuing the integrity of the resource itself has so far proven the most successful way of dealing with the challenges of managing multiple resources.

What are the current and future trends in forestry?
I believe there will be many changes in forestry in the future, from technological advancement to management methods and objectives. Climate change has been a real buzz word lately, and I believe we’ll see a shift in species management over my lifetime and thereafter. With so many looming threats, species diversity and vertical stratification will become increasingly important - - which isn’t to say that it’s being neglected now, but there’s likely to be a shift in paradigm, especially within northern hardwood management.

How has forestry changed since you graduated?
Aside from an almost extreme technological advancement, I can’t say that forestry practices have changed too much since I graduated, but I do think there is a movement to begin managing differently for our future - specifically in regards to the many threats on the horizon. Unfortunately, ash and beech are becoming a memory for the next generation much like chestnuts and elms are for me. The devastation to these species has caused our management strategies to change, and so have our silvicultural objectives.

I think we’re much more aware of what’s lurking around the corner and being more proactive at monitoring for and controlling pests like HWA and ALB. In this way our awareness of maintaining diversity in the landscape and monitoring the health of our forests has become more broadly understood by field foresters, not just specialists.

What advice would you give to students in the forestry major at MSU?
Before I offer any advice, I’d like to offer some encouragement: we need you! The next generation of foresters is going to be faced with many new challenges, some of which we’re just now learning how to control or, in some cases, live with. You’re learning from many of the Nation’s finest educators, so I advise you to take advantage of their experience and foresight. Your career in forestry will be much more than dealing with trees, so take the opportunity now to soak up as much as you can from many disciplines: forestry, wildlife, fisheries, pathogens, entomology, and, yes, human resources - and use this as a foundation on which to continuously build. One final piece of advice I can offer is this: never stop learning. Forests are incredibly dynamic environments; they’re perpetually changing, so we should always be observing and learning.

And never believe a forester who “knows it all”.

How do you balance family and career?
I’m extraordinarily blessed to have a wonderful fiance whose values are similar to my own. A forester himself, we understand and appreciate the efforts and extracurricular hours that go into our work. One of many benefits of having a significant other in my same profession is that we can bounce ideas or difficulties off of each other and have a productive, intellectual conversation about it. I will admit that family is my priority in life, but when you love your job as much as I do, it’s easy to put time and energy both.

Is there a specific skill or set of skills that you have found indispensable when performing your job?
The use of a compass has been indispensable. Technology - GPS, Smart Phones - is handy, but when your batteries run low or satellites aren’t able to communicate through thick canopies and cloud cover, that’s when many a forester has said words I can’t repeat here.

Is there a course you wish you had taken before leaving MSU?
Any forestry course offered that I didn’t take is one I wish I had taken. In the same vein, I wish I had better committed myself to my studies and not taken for granted all the information left unread in a book or untapped in a professor.

How has forestry related technology evolved since you graduated?
There has certainly been an increasing emphasis on technology as a method of gathering, storing, and relaying information since my first day inside the Natural Resources Building at MSU. Most of the technology I use now is rooted in the fundamental principles of more easily collecting and organizing data, but has greatly evolved, becoming far more sophisticated since those initial years. The proliferation of the internet, as another example, has made communication much more immediate and accessible. This sort of accessibility has made forestry (specific to the DNR) much more transparent and available to the public. Truthfully, the increased capacity to gather and share information enables us to perform our job with greater detail, accuracy, and efficiency.

Do you have a favorite forester living or not?
I have great appreciation for the life and legacy of Dr. Carl Schenck, a pioneer in silviculture and forestry education in the United States. His ideas of forest management and conservation are the foundation for the sustainable forestry practices we use now. Yet what I find most inspirational about his story is that he experienced so much failure early on (in his American career) but had the humility to address these mistakes in management and the perseverance to make the adaptations necessary to succeed. He was extraordinarily observant and proactive about forest management; a conscientious forester and a great model for future generations.

Is there a particular tree or group of trees you will always remember?
Legg Park is very near and dear to my heart. Having grown up within walking distance of its western boundary I spent many summers running through those woods and splashing in the river. There’s a small group of sassafras bisected by a trail that I would have to say is my favorite, and the most memorable, part of any run along those trails.

How much time do you spend in a forest or other landscape per week?
I’d estimate that 75% of my time at work (except for during fire season) is spent in the Great Outdoors. Outside of work, I try to spend as many hours as I can exploring new trails or enjoying old ones. Fortunately, I have a dog who won’t let me spend more time than necessary indoors, keeping me active in all seasons and appreciative of the sights and sounds of Northern Michigan.

Jobs

If you would like to have a job posted, please email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Contact Us

If you have questions, we can be reached by mail, phone and email.

Mail
Department of Forestry
Michigan State University
Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road, Room 126
East Lansing, MI 48824-1222

Phone
(517) 355-0090

Email
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Location

The Department of Forestry is located in the Natural Resources Building on the Michigan State University campus in East Lansing, Michigan. The main office is located on the first floor in Room 126 Natural Resources Building.

Our address is:

Department of Forestry
Michigan State University
Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road, Room 126
East Lansing, MI 48824-1222

View our location on the MSU Interactive Map.

Visitor parking is available nearby on Trowbridge Road in Ramp #5 (View on the MSU Interactive Map)

Online Forest Carbon Program

MSU‘s growing forest carbon program currently offers the Graduate Certificate in Forest Carbon Science, Policy, and Management and is expanding to offer a Forest Carbon Intensive Short Course in Summer 2016.

Online Graduate Certificate in Forest Carbon Science, Policy, and Management
Courses
Program Cost
Apply Now
Faculty
Academic Advising

Online Graduate Certificate in Forest Carbon Science, Policy, and ManagementImage of Forest Carbon Flyer

The Online Graduate Certificate in Forest Carbon Science, Policy, and Management offers participants the interdisciplinary tools and conceptual background to plan, implement, manage and evaluate forestry-based, climate-change mitigation projects. The Certificate program gives participants an edge in competing for employment in carbon mitigation projects of corporations, governments, and non-governmental organizations. Each of the four courses required to complete the certificate are now available online so participants can complete their training from anywhere in the world with an internet connection.
 

The program teaches participants how forest management actions affect forest carbon balance, the ins and outs of forest carbon markets, the social context of managing forests for carbon sequestration, and the tools for measuring, monitoring, and accounting for forest carbon – including satellite imagery, remote sensing, and integrated carbon sequestration models. 
 
The program is open to a wide range of participants, including students with a bachelor’s degree who are not enrolled in an M.S. or Ph.D. program, as well as current M.S. and Ph.D. students at MSU and other universities. To be considered for admission into the Graduate Certificate in Forest Carbon Science, Policy, and Management program, applicants should have completed a bachelor’s degree in forestry, natural resources, environmental sciences, or a related field. The program is open to students in any environment-related graduate program at MSU.
 
Given the need to integrate sustainability and climate change mitigation across all economic sectors, the program will consider applicants from all backgrounds, including those involved in business, law, forestry, natural resources, environmental consulting, and government. Participants without experience in forestry or a related field may need to supplement the certificate courses with independent study or additional coursework. The certification will appear on transcripts of MSU Graduate Students. Participants not enrolled in an MSU graduate degree program will receive an MSU Certificate. 

Courses

To earn the Certificate, students must complete all of the following courses, which are available online:

  • Forest Biogeochemistry and Global Climate Change (FOR 831)
  • Human Dimensions of Forest Carbon Management (FOR 833)
  • Forest Carbon Policy, Economics, and Finance (FOR 835)
  • Measurement and Monitoring of Forest Carbon (FOR 837)

FOR 831 and FOR 835 will be offered during Fall Semesters. FOR 833 and FOR 837 will be offered during Spring Semesters. See MSU Schedule of Courses for more detail.

Program Cost (Effective AY 2014-2015)

To explore tuition costs, see Student Accounts. Make sure to select the appropriate residency status and then select “Graduate” then scroll down to “Graduate Certification” to get the cost per credit hour. There are a total of 12 credits in the program in 4 3-credit courses. Costs are applied each semester based on the number of credits taken.
 
Besides the application fee and tuition expenses, there are no additional costs associated with the program. Please contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) to learn about securing financial support as well as the Department Forest Carbon Certificate Scholarship.

Financial Aid

The Forest Carbon Graduate Certificate Funding Toolkit is available to assist you in securing funding. Please contact Lauren Cooper at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) to receive this tool.
 
Department of Forestry Forest Carbon Graduate Certificate Scholarship
The Department of Forestry is pleased to announce the availability of scholarship support for three (3) incoming 2015–2016 Academic Year participants in the amount of $2000 each. The funds will be distributed on a ‘’per-course’’ basis – meaning that participants will receive one quarter (25%) of the total award in tuition support for each of the Certificate’s four courses.

Apply Now

Certificate-Only Students: If you would like to pursue the Certificate without earning a M.S. or Ph.D. through MSU, you still need to apply through the MSU Admissions office. Domestic students will need to provide official transcripts, whereas international students will need to provide official transcripts and TOEFL scores.  GRE scores are not required for the Certificate alone. Visit the Apply Now page for full instructions, or go directly to http://admissions.msu.edu/apply.asp to complete the online application.

MSU-Degree Students: Students who are currently enrolled, or are already applying to, a graduate degree program at MSU do not need to complete a separate application for the Certificate program. However, please contact Lauren Cooper at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) and share your plans to complete the certificate to ensure appropriate administrative changes are made. If you are a student in the Department of Forestry, this certificate has a special waiver so that all courses in the certificate program may double count to your graduate degree requirements at Michigan State University.

Enrollment is now open for 2015 Fall Semester. Applications received by July 10th will be given full consideration. U.S. domestic individuals must complete the application and deliver transcripts; international individuals must complete the application, deliver transcripts, and submit TOEFL scores. Additionally, all applicants must pay the application fee.

Faculty

The Forest Carbon Certificate is supported with instruction and advisory oversight from:

Academic Advising

If you have questions about the Graduate Certificate in Forest Carbon Science, Policy, and Management, please contact Lauren Cooper:

Lauren Cooper
Academic Specialist/Forest Carbon Certificate Program Coordinator
121 Natural Resources Building
Michigan State University
480 Wilson Road
East Lansing, MI 48824
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Christmas Tree Extension

The Christmas Tree Extension website was developed and is supported by the MSU Forestry faculty, who are dedicated to supporting the Christmas tree industry in Michigan. 

Go to Christmas Tree Extension

Scholarships

Annually, more than $200,000 is available in scholarships for students majoring in Forestry. Scholarship awards range from $2,000 per year to full tuition. For students participating in the Forests Forever Scholars Program (see below), scholarship support is renewable for a total term of four years, contingent on satisfactory academic performance (a GPA greater than 3.2 at MSU) and active participation in Forests Forever activities.

The Forests Forever Scholars Program provides opportunities for leadership development and further learning outside of the classroom. Most students receiving scholarships also participate in the Forests Forever Scholars Program. All Scholars develop a ‘leadership through service’ project each semester, which provides the opportunity to apply their forestry education in a broader context. Scholars also have the opportunity to participate in leadership training. We expect scholars to be leaders in the intellectual and social community of the Department.

APPLY NOW by emailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) and requesting a scholarship application.  You must be a US Citizen to apply for scholarships.

Scholarships administered outside the Department of Forestry

Two scholarships are administered outside the Department of Forestry through the Michigan Forestry and Park Association. These are the:

  • Robert F. Brevitz Scholarship (urban forestry)
  • Garfield Scholarship (arboriculture, park management, public utility forestry)

To apply for the Robert F. Brevitz or Garfield Scholarships, please complete the online scholarship application available by emailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Please submit three letters of reference (from at least one faculty member and one employer) to the Undergraduate Academic Advisor at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). For the Garfield Scholarship, please also submit your official transcripts. These materials will then be forwarded to the Robert F. Brevitz / Garfield Scholarship Award Committee. 

Additional External Scholarships:

National Wood Flooring Association Education & Research Foundation Wood Studies Scholarship ($1000 to a current high school senior who will study forestry, environmental science, or natural resources).  Deadline is February 1, 2016.  Email the Undergraduate Academic Advisor for an application.

Wood Splitters Direct Forestry Scholarship (next award given in January 2017): https://www.woodsplitterdirect.com/wood-splitters-direct-forestry-scholarship/

For more information on scholarships, contact us at:

Undergraduate Academic Advisor
122 Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road
East Lansing, MI 48823
(517) 355-0091
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

Undergraduate Student Spotlight

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Name: Anna Boruszewski

Hometown: Okemos, MI

Why Forestry: I wanted a degree that could get me outside, but also had jobs available.  I looked through all the degrees that MSU had to offer and felt that Forestry matched those two criteria beautifully.

Career Goal: My ultimate goal would be studying and/or harvesting submerged logs.  I find that they are an often forgotten natural resource.  I have also thought of attending graduate school and eventually becoming a professor. I would like to teach the next generation about the exciting field of Forestry.

Activities: I am currently the Secretary of the MSU Forestry Club.  I send out weekly reminders and minutes to all the club members.  When I am not at school, I like to go hiking, biking, and taking relaxing strolls around my neighborhood.

Forestry Advice: Never straddle a moss-covered log…

Extra Comment: The Forestry friends you make here will become more than just friends; they will become a part of your family.  Always treasure the times you have together.

 

 

Graduate Student Spotlight

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Name:Yusuf Samsudin

 

Hometown: Kandangan, South Kalimantan, Indonesia

 

Degree: Master of Science (MS) in Forestry with a focus on Forest Carbon Science, Policy, and Management

(Advisor Dr. Larry Leefers)

 

Why forestry: 

 

I spent my childhood in an area where forest ecosystems have changed and were the direct victim of forest fires and haze. This made me realize that forests are essential elements in human life. I also believe that policy and governance are essential to better and sustained management of forests. There is a lot of attention from international groups regarding tropical forests due their role in climate change and biodiversity, but there is only minor participation from the local people in Kalimantan in determining the fate of their forests. To further my knowledge prior to my graduate study, I joined several international organizations, including the Forestry Department of FAO, the UN Office for REDD+ Coordination in Indonesia (UNORCID), and the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) to work on multiple issues on sustainable forest management from an international perspective.

 

 

Graduate Research Focus: I am interested to see how policy would affect the development of Industrial Forest (IF) plantations as a means for sustainable forest management policy given widespread deforestation and forest degradation.

 

Awards:

 

  1. ITTO Freezailah Fellowship to conduct a study on Industrial Forest plantation development in Indonesia (2015)

  2. GIZ-BAFU Fellowship to attend UNFF meeting at Interlaken, Switzerland (2015)

  3. Tanoto Foundation Fellowship to attend the XXIV IUFRO World Congress at Salt Lake City (2014)

  4. Foreign Fulbright Master’s Program to study at Michigan State University (2014-2016)

 

Experience:

  1. Selected as Asia-Pacific youth delegation to attend the United Nations Forum on Forests (UNFF) Interlaken +10 | Governing forest landscapes: Lesson learnt from ten years of experience and the way forward post-2015, Switzerland, February 2015

     

  2. Attended the XXIV IUFRO World Congress and presented a paper titled “Forest biodiversity in climate change adaptation; what is the role of IPBES and IPCC” co-authored with Dr. Peter Bridgewater of ANU, Salt Lake City, Utah October 2014

Publication:

  1. Samsudin, Y.B., Pirard, R. 2015. Conflict mediation in industrial tree plantation in Indonesia: Status and prospects. CIFOR, Bogor, Indonesia DOI: 10.17528/cifor/005443

 

After Graduation Plans:

Forests face great threats and challenges to the issue of development. Thus, I would like to find an opportunity to work in sustainable forest management at the international level in the area of policy and governance with a goal of finding a better solution of forests and forestry challenges.


MSU Forestry Alumni Association Officers

Alumni OfficersBill Schmidt, FAA President

John Anton, FAA Secretary

Jim Kielbaso, FAA Treasurer

To contact the MSU Forestry Alumni Associated Officers, please send an email to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

 

Michigan State Forester Newsletter

The MSU Forester newsletter is published currently on a biennial basis and we need your help to make this financially possible.

  • If we have your e-mail address, we will send you an electronic copy (PDF) of the newsletter when future issues are ready.
  • If you wish to continue receiving the newsletter in hardcopy form, please let us know and we will do our best to mail a copy to you.
  • If you do not wish to receive our newsletter at all, please let us know and we will remove you from our distribution list.

Please contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) ((517) 355-0090) to submit your e-mail address, to request a hardcopy, or to be removed from our distribution list. We cannot guarantee that you will receive future newsletters unless you submit an e-mail address to us or request the newsletter in hardcopy format.

Thanks for staying in touch!

Spring 2015 MSU Forester: Download Now!

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Archives

Forestry Experts

 

NAME

AREA(S) OF EXPERTISE

CONTACT INFORMATION

Bill Cook
Upper Peninsula Extension Forester & Wildlife Biologist, Michigan State University

  • Forestry
  • Forest Management
  • Wood Energy/Biomass
  • Habitat Management/Wildlife Ecology
  • Oak Wilt

Michigan Society of American Foresters
U.P. Tree Identification
Michigan Forests Forever
                                        
Michigan Forest Pathway

Forest Biomass Innovation Center
6005 J Road
Escanaba, MI 49829-9791
Phone: (906) 786-1575
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Elaine Bush
Extension Educator and Firewise Program Coordinator

  • Wildfire

Agriculture Hall
446 W. Circle Dr., Room 11
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (231) 499-2374 (cell)
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Russell P. Kidd
Extension Forestry Educator

  • Forest/wildlife habitat management and timber sales
  • Forest health
  • Maple syrup and other non-timber forest products
  • Wildfire and Firewise

Roscommon County Extension
PO Box 507
Roscommon, MI 48653-0507
Phone: (989) 275-4670
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Deborah C. McCullough
Professor, Forest Entomology, Michigan State University

  • Forest Entomology

243 Natural Science
Dept. of Entomology
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824-1115
Phone: (517) 355-7445
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Maureen McDonough
Professor, Forestry, Michigan State University

  • Forest sociology
  • Social forestry

Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road, Room 119
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 4882
Phone: (517) 432-2293
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Pascal Nzokou
Assistant Professor, Forestry, Michigan State University

Christmas Trees

Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road, Room 126
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 432-5664
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Georgia Peterson
Forestry Extension & Outreach Specialist, Michigan Department of Natural Resources

  • Forest sociology
  • Natural resources leadership development

MDNR FMFMD
PO Box 30452
Lansing, MI 48909-7952
Phone: (517) 335-7383
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  

Karen Potter-Witter
Professor, Forestry, Michigan State University

  • Forest Economics

Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road, Room 111
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-9447
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Kevin Sayers
Urban & Community Forestry Specialist, Michigan Department of Natural Resources

 

MDNR FMFMD
PO Box 30452
Lansing, MI 48909
Phone: (517) 241-4632
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Mike Schira
Extension Educator, Houghton-Keweenaw County Michigan State University Extension

  • Firewise
  • Forest Management

Houghton/Keweenaw Extension
1500 Birch Street
Hancock, MI 49930
Phone: (906) 482-5830
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dean R. Solomon
Senior Extension Educator, Charlevoix County Michigan State University Extension

  • Forest stewardship, planning and zoning

Charlevoix County Extension
319B North Lake Street
Boyne City, MI 49712-1101
Phone: (231) 582-6232
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Michael Walters
Associate Professor, Forestry, Michigan State University
  • Forest Ecology

Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road, Room 210C
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 355-1762
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Publications

Individual Tree ID and Care

Identifying Trees of Michigan
Fertilizing Shade and Ornamental Trees

Tree Planting for Reforestation

Tree Planting in Michigan - Extension Bulletin E-771 • June 1989 (Revision)
Selecting Coniferous Planting Stock for Michigan Soil Management Groups  - Extension Bulletin E-721 • Reprinted August 1982
Increasing Hardwood Planting Success Using Tree Shelters - Forestry Fact Sheet #12 - 1989
Site Preparation and Release Herbicides for Tree Production - Forestry Fact Sheet #13 - 1989
Herbicides for Year-of-Planting Weed Control in Hardwood and Conifer Plantations - Extension Bulletin E-2752 - 2001
Site Preparation and Tree Planting for Forest Production - Extension Bulletin E-2753 - 2001
Controlling Broadleaf Weeds and Grasses for Plantation Site Preparation - Extension Bulletin E-2754 - 2001
Planting Oaks for Timber and Other Uses - Extension Bulletin NCR-605 - November 1997

Forest Stand Improvement

Poison Ivy Control - Extension Bulletin E-1517 - 1988
Pruning Red Pine - Forestry Fact Sheet #7 - 1989

Forest Health

Pin Oak and Gypsy Moth - Forestry Fact Sheet #20 - 1992
Oak Wilt Update in Michigan - Forestry Fact Sheet #21 - 1992
Common Oak Defoliators in Michigan - Extension Bulletin E-2633 - August 1999
Shoot Boring Insects

General Forest Management

Forest Resource Management Terminology - Extension Bulletin NCR-478 - July 2006
Forest Resource Facts - Forestry Fact Sheet #16 - 1996
Why Manage Your Woodlot Extension - Bulletin E-1492 • Reprinted December 1984
Water Quality Best Management Practices - Extension Bulletin E-2770 - 2001
Michigan Forest Communities: A Field Guide and Reference - Extension Bulletin E-3000 - 2004

Managing for Specific Tree Species

Northern Hardwood Forest Management - Extension Bulletin E-2769 - 2001
Aspen Management in Michigan - Extension Bulletin E-1552 • December 1988 - available through MSU Extension Bookstore
Wildlife Considerations in Red Pine Management - Forestry Fact Sheet #9 - 1989
Thinning Red Pine Forestry - Fact Sheet #8 - 1989
The Status of the Maple-Birch Forest Type in Michigan - Research Report 533 • May 1993

Forest Economics & Marketing

So, You Need Some Cash from Your Farm Woodlot? - Forestry Fact Sheet #4 - 1988
Getting the Mo$t from Your Farm Woodland - Forestry Fact Sheet #28- 1999
Cutting and Selling Timber from Your Farm Woodlot - Forestry Fact Sheet #5 - 1988
To Sell or Not To Sell? Important Considerations When Harvesting Hardwoods for Income - Extension Bulletin E-2832 - October 2002
You’ve Been Asked to Sell Your Timber: What Do You Do Next? - Forestry Fact Sheet #23 - 1993
How Much Are My Hardwoods Worth? - Forestry Fact Sheet #10 - 2005
Timber Sale Bids - Forestry Fact Sheet #25 - 1996
Timber Sales Contracts - Extension Bulletin E-1656 - 1993
Tax Treatment of Timber Acquisition and Reforestation Costs - Forestry Fact Sheet #1 - 2005
Can I Deduct Forest Management Costs on My Income Taxes? - Forestry Fact Sheet #15 - 1989
Minimizing Federal Income Tax for Forest Landowners
Timber Income Tax Preparers - Forestry Fact Sheet #30 - 1999
Reduce Your Taxes with Conservation Easements - Extension Bulletin NCR-446 - 1994

Christmas Trees

Recommended Species for Christmas Tree Planting - Extension Bulletin NCR-479 - 1993
Fertilization of Christmas Trees in Michigan - Forestry Fact Sheet #2 - 1988
Site Preparation and Release Herbicides for Christmas Tree Production - Forestry Fact Sheet #14 - 1989
Effective Herbicide Use in Christmas Tree Plantations - Extension Bulletin NCR-251 - 1997
Growing Christmas Trees in Michigan - Extension Bulletin E-1172 - 1992
Life History and Control of Pine Root Collar Weevil in Christmas Tree Fields
Scale Insects of Christmas Trees - Extension Bulletin E-2477 - 1994
Shearing Recommendations for Christmas Tree Producers - Extension Bulletin NCR-310E - 1991
Christmas Tree Growers and the Gypsy Moth - Forestry Fact Sheet #22 - 1993

Forest Products

How Much Lumber in That Tree? - Extension Bulletin E-2915 - 2004
Alternative Forestry Related Farm Cash Crops - Forestry Fact Sheet #3 - 1988
Homemade Maple Syrup - Forestry Fact Sheet #17 - 1990
A Guide to Getting Started in Forest Products Exporting - MSU Department of Forestry, September 1996
International Trade Information Sources for Forest Products

People in Forestry—Professional Directories

Michigan Consulting Foresters Directory
Source List of Persons Knowledgeable in Urban Forestry

Research Centers

Tree Research Center
W.K. Kellogg Experimental Forest
Forest Biomass Innovation Center

Tree Research Center (Est. 1963)

The Tree Research Center (TRC) is the department’s on-campus field unit, and is part of the East Lansing Field Research Facilities of the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station. In 1963, the MSU Forestry Department established the 30-acre Tree Research Center after its campus Bogue Nursery was closed to make room for new dormitory construction. The TRC is located 3 miles south of main campus and includes administrative and storage buildings, greenhouses, a two acre nursery, and numerous field plantations. The land base expanded in 1982 when one hundred acres of field and woodlands at the adjacent Sandhill Research Area became available for department use.

Staff

Randy Klevickas
Resident Farm Manager
(517) 353-2036
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Paul Bloese
Research Manager
(517) 353-2036
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

The Tree Research Center is open Monday through Friday, 8am to 5pm. It is closed during all holidays observed by the University. Visitors are welcome and tours are available by appointment. Please call ahead at 517-353-2036.  

Directions

The Tree Research Center is located at the corner of Jolly Road and Hagadorn Road, about 3 miles south of main campus.

Tree Research Center
Michigan State University
5640 E. Jolly Road
Lansing, MI 48910

For more information, contact:

Tree Research Center
Randy Klevickas
Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Rd., Room 126
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824-1222
Phone: (517) 353-2036

W.K. Kellogg Experimental Forest (Est. 1932)

Established on abandoned agricultural land, the 716-acre Kellogg Experimental Forest is known worldwide for research on tree breeding and genetics, planting techniques, and plantation establishment and management. Much of the research that developed the Spartan spruce, a hybrid that combines the color and drought resistance of a blue spruce and the softer needles and rapid growth rate of the white spruce, was done at the Kellogg Forest. The forest is open to the public for biking, hiking, horseback riding and cross-country skiing, and also has several interpretive trails.

For more information, contact:

W.K. Kellogg Experimental Forest
Greg Kowalewski
7060 N. 42nd Street
Augusta, MI 49012
Phone: (269) 731-4597
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Forest Biomass Innovation Center (Est. 1986)

The 1,700-acre MSU Forest Biomass Innovation Center in Escanaba is leading a number of initiatives to increase the sustainable use of wood in Michigan’s expanding bioeconomy. This wood will come from the surplus growing in the forests and from willow and poplar energy plantations on marginal farm land in the northern parts of the state. Work focuses on increasing yields, decreasing costs, reducing greenhouse gas and energy losses, retaining rural jobs, and improving supply chain efficiencies. Research at the center is also focusing on forest genetics, silviculture, and forested wetland management.

For more information, contact:

MSU Forest Biomass Innovation Center
Raymond Miller
6005 J Road
Escanaba, MI 49829
Phone: 906-786-1575
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

Giving

Gifts to the Department of Forestry, in any amount, have a huge impact on our research and academic programs, and most importantly, the lives of MSU Forestry students through endowed scholarships and fellowships. Show your support for the Department of Forestry by making a tax-deductible gift today.

Ways to Support the Department of Forestry

Support General Funding: To provide the greatest flexibility for the Department to capitalize on opportunities and address areas of greatest need, please consider making a donation to our discretionary funds. To have the greatest immediate impact, donations to the General Gift Account will make the full amount of your donation available for spending. For long-term impact, investment returns on donations to the Anderson Family Endowment will support the Department in perpetuity. 

Support Undergraduate Scholarships: One of our top priorities for further funding, the Department of Forestry Endowed Scholarship can be used to recruit new students to our program, which is an ongoing and important activity. 

Support Graduate Fellowships: The Carol Christine Gustafson Endowed Scholarship Fund is intended for research and stipend support for graduate students who have demonstrated capacity to achieve educational and professional goals, motivation to achieve these goals, and initiative to seek opportunities to further their progress. 

Support Field-based Learning: To support field-based learning of our students, please consider a gift to the Forestry Summer Camp Endowment Fund.

 

Gifts by Mail

Gifts can also be mailed to:

Department of Forestry
Natural Resources Building

480 Wilson Road, Room 126
East Lansing, MI 48824

Please make checks payable to “Michigan State University” and be sure to include the name of the fund and the gift allocation number you wish to contribute to on the memo line. Thank you!

 

CONTRIBUTE NOW

or

Send contributions of any amount to the address below. Please use Appeal Code 01203.

Samantha Adler
CANR External Relations
446 West Circle Drive
Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture, Room 319
East Lansing, MI 48824

 

Forms & Handbooks

Master’s Program Forms
Doctoral Program Forms
Travel Forms
Graduate Student Handbook
Responsible Conduct of Research Training Plan

Master’s Program Forms

Doctoral Program Forms

Travel Forms
Travel Authorization and Emergency Contact Form
(Travel Advance)

Graduate Student Handbook
This handbook provides a summary of University, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and Department of Forestry policies and academic regulations affecting Forestry graduate students. View Graduate Student Handbook.

Responsible Conduct of Research Training Guide
Department of Forestry Responsible Conduct of Research Training Plan

M.S. and Ph.D. Programs

Graduate Programs
Programs of Study
Application Deadline
Scholarships and Assistantships
Academic Advising
Apply Now!

Graduate Programs

Masters of Science in Forestry (M.S.)
Students interested in pursuing a M.S. in Forestry may choose between Research-Intensive (Plan A) and Professional (Plan B) Tracks. Both degree tracks require a total of 30 credit hours. In addition to coursework, students in the Research-Intensive track are expected to conduct original research leading to the completion of a thesis. This work is expected to result in at least one publication in the peer-reviewed scientific literature. In the Professional Track, the focus is primarily on coursework, although the students are required to complete a final report. See the Department of Forestry’s Graduate Handbook for specific requirements. If you are applying for a M.S., it is very important to indicate in your application to which degree track (Research Intensive vs Professional) you are applying. Do this at the end of your Academic Statement. If you are applying for the Research Intensive Track also indicate which faculty member(s) you are interested in working with.

Doctor of Philosophy in Forestry (Ph.D.)
Students interested in eventually pursuing a Ph.D. or a career in research should consider the Research-Intensive Track. The Professional Track may be more appropriate for students interested in management-oriented careers, either with public agencies, non-governmental organizations or the private sector. Students will not be admitted into the Research Intensive M.S. program or the Ph.D. program until a faculty member has agreed to serve as major professor. If you’re interested in applying for the Research Intensive M.S. or a Ph.D. you are encouraged to contact individual faculty members directly.

Programs of Study

  • Biometry
  • Ecology
  • Entomology and Pathology
  • Environmental Toxicology
  • Genetics
  • Resource Economics
  • Soils and Hydrology
  • Silviculture
  • Social Forestry
  • Agro Forestry
  • Tree Physiology
  • Urban and Community Forestry
  • Wood Science

View descriptions of Programs of Study

Application Deadline

Application materials must be submitted by December 15 for admission the following fall semester. Applications received after this date will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

Scholarships and Assistantships

Graduate Scholarships and Assistantships

Michigan Christmas Tree Association Graduate Scholarship ($300) - Awarded to a graduate student who has demonstrated interest and participation in the Christmas tree industry and high scholarship.

Graduate Research Assistantships

Depending on the availability of funds in the department and in individual research projects, research assistantships may be available on a quarter-time or half-time (rarely three-quarter-time) basis. Besides a monthly stipend, assistantship recipients receive many other benefits including tuition waivers and health benefits. More information is available in the Graduate Student Handbook.

Academic Advising

If you have questions about the graduate program in the Department of Forestry, please contact the Director of Graduate Studies in Forestry, Dr. David Rothstein, Associate Professor of Forest Ecology/Biogeochemistry.

Dr. David Rothstein
126 Natural Resources Building
Michigan State University
480 Wilson Road
East Lansing, MI 48824
517.432.3353
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Apply Now!

Department Directory

Name

Phone Number

Email

Address

Bloese, Paul

(517) 353-2036

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Tree Research Center

Brown, Dan

(517) 898-5670

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

210a Natural Resources

Chhin, Sophan

(517) 353-7251

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

114 Natural Resources

Cook, Mike

(517) 353-9580

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

104 Natural Resources

Cooper, Lauren

(517) 353-1961

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

121 Natural Resources

Dickmann, Don

(517) 353-5199

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

120 Natural Resources

Dunnebacke, Sandra

(517) 355-2726

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

123 Natural Resources

Epperson, Bryan

(517) 355-9597

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

116 Natural Resources

Finley, Andrew

(517) 432-7219

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

211 Natural Resources

Finley, Sarah

(517) 355-0092

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

101 Natural Resources

Grand, Stephanie

(517) 488-4145

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

109 Natural Resources

Gurley, Ray

(989) 798-3829

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

36 Natural Resources

Kielbaso, Jim

(517) 355-7533

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

117 Natural Resources

Klevickas, Randy

(517) 353-2036

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Tree Research Center

Kobe, Rich

(517) 355-0093

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

125 Natural Resources

Kowalewski, Greg

(269) 731-4597

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Kellogg Forest

Leefers, Larry

(517) 355-0097

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

210E Natural Resources

MacFarlane, David

(517) 355-2399

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

215 Natural Resources

Mack, Juli

(517) 355-0090

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

126 Natural Resources

Mastenbrook, Ross

(517) 355-2380

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

124 Natural Resources

McCullough, Deb

(517) 355-7445

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

152 Natural Science

McDonough, Maureen

(517) 432-2293

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

119 Natural Resources

Miesel, Jessica

(517) 355-8239

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

110 Natural Resources

Miller, Ray

(906) 786-1575

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

FBIC

Nguyen, Phu

(517) 353-5249

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

118 Natural Resources

Nzokou, Pascal

(517) 432-5664

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

210D Natural Resources

Potter-Witter, Karen

(517) 353-9447

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

111 Natural Resources

Propst, Dennis

 

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Rothstein, Dave

(517) 432-3353

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

109 Natural Resources

Samek, Jay

(517) 432-3924

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

101 Manly Miles

Santos, Fernanda

 

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

129 Natural Resources

Schumacher-Lott, Lesley

(517) 355-0091

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

122 Natural Resources

Skole, Dave

(517) 355-1778

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

101 Manly Miles

Stark, Scott

 

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

102 Natural Resources

Walters, Mike

(517) 355-1762

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

210C Natural Resources

Yin, Runsheng

(517) 432-3352

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

115 Natural Resources

Zarnetske, Phoebe

(517) 355-7671

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

213 Natural Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B.S. in Forestry

Bachelor of Science in Forestry
What Do Foresters Do? Where Do Foresters Work?
Learn Through Experience
Requirements for the B.S. in Forestry
Course Descriptions
Scholarships and the Forests Forever Scholars Program
Contact Us

Bachelor of Science in Forestry

Established in 1902, the undergraduate forestry degree at Michigan State University has been recognized as one of the nation’s top forestry programs.

The goal of the program is to prepare students to address pressing natural resource, environmental and energy issues through coursework in the biological and social sciences. Outside of the classroom, students bolster their education through study abroad programs, independent studies and professional internships.

Internationally-renowned faculty guide students through active learning, preparing them to be leaders and stewards in sustainable forest management.

What do foresters do?

  • Develop plans to balance forest conservation, recreation and products
  • Promote a sustainable economy through renewable forest products
  • Conserve biological diversity and habitats    
  • Mitigate climate change through reforestation and managing carbon offset projects
  • Control the negative effects of invasive exotic plant and insect species
  • Enhance biodiversity and alleviate rural poverty through international reforestation
  • Create urban green space and infrastructure

Where do foresters work?

  • State Departments of Natural Resources (MI and other states)
  • US Forest Service
  • US Bureau of Land Management
  • Tree care companies
  • Community non-profits
  • City forestry organizations
  • Conservation groups
  • Peace Corps
  • Real estate investment trusts
  • Timber management companies
  • Forestry consulting firms

Learn through experience

There are numerous opportunities to learn outside the classroom, including field trips, internships, research and study abroad. In fact, MSU offers more study abroad programs than any other public university.

Students also have the chance to learn through teaching. Several local events throughout the year—like MSU Museum’s Darwin Discovery Days and MSU’s Annual Science Festival—have become great settings for students to demonstrate to the greater community the role that forests play in our everyday lives.

The MSU Forestry Club—a Society of American Foresters student chapter—sponsors numerous activities, including maple syrup production, forestry skills competitions, camping trips and professional seminars. Visit them on Facebook! - Michigan State Forestry Club

Requirements for the B.S. in Forestry

View Requirements for the B.S. in Forestry, available through the MSU Office of the Registrar.

Course Descriptions

View Forestry course descriptions, available through the MSU Office of the Registrar.

Scholarships and the Forests Forever Scholars Program

Annually, more than $200,000 is available in scholarships for students majoring in Forestry. Scholarship awards range from $2,000 per year to full tuition and are renewable for a total term of four years, contingent on satisfactory academic performance. Scholarship recipients also have the opportunity to participate in the Forests Forever Scholars Program, which provides opportunities for leadership development and further learning outside of the classroom. For more information on these scholarships, go to Scholarships for Incoming Students.

Contact Us

Undergraduate Academic Advisor
Lesley Schumacher-Lott
122 Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road
East Lansing, MI 48824
(517) 355-0091
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

Historical Timeline

A Timeline of Forestry at MSU

1871

In early October, students and faculty at the fledgling Michigan Agricultural College (MAC) fight a forest fire approaching from the north and save the campus.

1873

Dr. William J. Beal establishes an on-campus arboretum, which today is the oldest continuously operated university botanical garden in the United States.

1883

Beal is appointed professor of botany and forestry, making him one of the first faculty members in forestry in the country.

1896

The Beal Pinetum, one of the oldest forest plantations in the state, is established near the Red Cedar River.

1902

The “Forestry Course,” a four-year curriculum in forestry begins in September. E.E. Bogue appointed head of the Department of Forestry.

1904

The first two foresters—George C. Morbeck and Frank H. Sanford—graduate in June from MAC.

1912

C.A. Tyler of Coldwater appointed the first forestry extension specialist in the state.

1914

The Department of Forestry moves into more spacious quarters in the Old Dairy Building (later renamed Chittenden hall).

1915

The maple syrup demonstration-research project starts in the “River Woodlot,” now known as Sanford Woods. It ran for 50 years.

1925

Dunbar Forest, a 577 acre parcel located 14 miles south of Sault Ste. Marie, is given to Michigan State College (MSC) and becomes the long-time home of the forestry summer camp.

1931

W.K. Kellogg (of cereal fame) gives MSC two eroded farms west of Battle Creek to be used to demonstrate the benefits of reforestation. This world renowned property is known today as the W.K. Kellogg Experimental Forest.

1934 

The college nursery, established in 1903, produces tree seedlings for the new Civilian Conservation Corps.

1936

The Chittenden Cabin, a student social hub, is completed on the banks of the Red Cedar River. It was demolished in 1965 to make way for the new Wells Hall.

1939

Fred Russ gives MSC 580 acres of land east of Dowagiac, including Newton Woods, an old-growth hardwood stand that later is listed on the National Park Service Register of Natural Landmarks.

1950

A major reorganization splits off three new departments from the MSC Department of Forestry—Wood Utilization (later Forest Products), Fisheries and Wildlife, and Land and Water Conservation (later Resource Development).

1966

The MSU Departments of Forestry, Forest Products, Fisheries and Wildlife, and Resource Development move into the brand new Natural Resources Building.

1969

The MSU Department of Forest Products is merged back into the Department of Forestry.

1976

Toumey Woods, an old-growth maple-beech forest on south campus, is placed on the National Park Service Register of Natural Landmarks.

1986

The MSU Upper Peninsula Tree Improvement Center (UPTIC) is established near Escanaba.

1992

The MSU Department of Forestry is ranked #3 in the country in a nationwide survey conducted by Penn State University.

2000

MSU Department of Forestry alumnus Fred Arnold establishes the Wood Manufacturing and Marketing Program with a $1 million endowment. The David and Mary Jessup endowment is created to help defray the cost of students attending the forestry spring camp.

2001

In September the MSU Department of Forestry kicks off its year-long 100th anniversary celebration.

2005

To address the broadening scope of forestry, a new curriculum is offered featuring concentrations in Forest Conservation and Environmental Studies, Forest Resource Management, Forest Sciences, Urban and Community Forestry, and Wood Products Manufacturing and Marketing.

2007

The Chronicle of Higher Education ranked the MSU Department of Forestry as the #3 forest resources/forestry program in the United States.

Alumni Contact Form

Extension & Outreach

Welcome to the Extension & Outreach section. Do you have a question for us? We have experts on hand, as well as publications, to help answer your forestry questions.

We also encourage you to check out forestry information from Michigan State University Extension.

 

Graduate

To ensure forests for our future, our global society needs to find the optimal balance between maintaining forest ecosystems and the demand for forest products. As this challenge becomes more complex, professionals trained in the principles of forest ecology, soil science, and silviculture as well as in political science, sociology, and the humanities, will be in great demand in the next ten to twenty years and beyond. The Forestry Department at Michigan State University offers master of science and doctoral degree programs that can provide you with the additional knowledge, skills, and resources to meet this challenge effectively. Career opportunities in research, management, teaching, extension, or consulting are available with private corporations, environmental organizations, universities, environmental consultants, and governmental agencies.

Alumni

Alumni Contact Form

Michigan State Forester Newsletter

MSU Forestry Alumni Association Officers

Forestry Alumni Profile

MSU Forestry Alumni Photos

Undergraduate

Formally established in 1902, the MSU Department of Forestry is the oldest continuing forestry program in the United States. The Forestry major combines elements of ecology, biology, environmental science, public policy, and economics to address a variety of environmental and social issues - from combating global climate change and invasive species to providing forest products and wildlife habitats.

About

Welcome to the Department of Forestry at Michigan State University.

Events

News

People

Home

Formally established in 1902, the MSU Department of Forestry is the oldest continuing forestry program in the United States. The Forestry major combines elements of ecology, biology, environmental science, public policy, and economics to address a variety of environmental and social issues - from combating global climate change and invasive species to providing forest products and wildlife habitats.

  • Hendrick recommended as new College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Dean at MSU

    Ronald L. Hendrick

    Posted on January 25, 2016 3:54pm

    Ronald L. Hendrick will be recommended as dean of Michigan State University’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. If approved by the MSU Board of Trustees, Hendrick’s appointment will be effective July 1, 2016.

     

  • Migratory Songbirds Adapt to Climate Warming Through Flexible Breeding

    Posted on December 7, 2015 12:38pm

    Migratory Songbirds Adapt to Climate Warming Through Flexible Breeding

  • POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Research Associate

    Posted on August 14, 2015 11:02am

    The Department of Forestry at Michigan State University, in collaboration with the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station, is seeking a highly motivated research associate (post-doctoral researcher) for a project investigating soil heating processes and the effects of soil heating on soil carbon, nutrients, seedbanks and hardwood regeneration.

    For more information and to apply for this position, please refer to the official position posting at https://jobs.msu.edu and search for Posting #1796.

  • Spartan Pure maple syrup from MSU

    Posted on July 28, 2015 11:40am

    Michigan State University is tapping into the expertise of researchers through the development of Spartan Pure Maple Syrup.

    The MSU Department of Forestry used roughly 2,000 sugar maple trees covering 70 acres at the Fred Russ Forest in Decatur, Mich. to create a product that’s available to the public. Ten additional acres have remained untapped so researchers can compare growth with that of tapped trees.

     

  • MSU research associate receives postdoctoral fellowship

    Posted on July 27, 2015 1:32pm

    Michigan State University (MSU) research associate Nina Lany was named a 2015 Arnold O. Beckman postdoctoral fellow by the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation. She is the sole recipient at MSU.

    Lany’s work in the MSU departments of Fisheries and Wildlife and Forestry centers on climate change. The grant will fund her research, titled “Improving Predictions of Climate Change Effects on Ecological Communities with Ecological Complexity.”

     

  • Three CANR graduate students awarded National Science Foundation fellowships

    Kileigh Browning

    Posted on April 15, 2015 4:17pm

    Three graduate students from the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) at Michigan State University have been awarded prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) graduate research fellowships.

     

  • Scholarship recognizes MSU forestry professor’s work

    Old forestry map

    Posted on January 16, 2015 12:20pm

    When Maureen McDonough, professor in the Department of Forestry, retires this month, she will have spent nearly 35 years in an industry that’s seen incredible changes. And a scholarship in her name will help ensure that future MSU forestry students have the opportunity to witness the same types of changes. 

    “When I started in forestry, it was very old school, and that’s changed dramatically,” McDonough said. McDonough has studied urban and community forestry and the human dimensions affecting those forests.

     

  • MSU Forestry Associate Professor Andrew Finley’s Research Featured at Wired.com

    Posted on December 17, 2014 11:57am

    This week, MSU Forestry Associate Professor Andrew Finley and his involvement with mapping the Alaskan Forest were featured at Wired.com. Finley is part of a team of US Forest Service and NASA scientists and his role has been to develop data products that ultimately help the scientists understand the current and changing Alaskan Forest. The article is available at http://www.wired.com/2014/12/alaska-laser-survey-3d-map/

  • MSU forestry student receives Fulbright grant to study forests in Costa Rica

    Clarice Esch

    Posted on December 5, 2014 1:19pm

    Clarice Esch, a doctoral student in the Michigan State University (MSU) Department of Forestry, recently received a grant through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program to conduct research in Costa Rica. Esch will spend 10 months in San Gerardo de Rivas, Costa Rica, researching issues related to sustainable forestry.

  • Conflict, Collaboration & Consensus in Natural Resource Issues class scheduled for Spring 2015

    Posted on December 3, 2014 12:20pm

    Do you work with natural resource-based groups or individuals who often find themselves in conflict situations?  Michigan State University Extension offers an intensive program designed to help you gain confidence and competence in helping groups and communities productively address contentious natural resource issues.

    Participants will:

    • Gain conflict resolution skills related to listening, questioning, dealing with difficult behaviors, and facilitating dialogue 

    • Achieve a deeper understanding of the continuum of conflict management options and approaches, and skill in diagnosing situations and choosing appropriate strategies

    • Build expertise in facilitating collaborative problem solving and deliberation among groups

    • Form a clearer understanding of the roles of both scientific facts and human values in contentious issues

    • Explore alternative approaches to synthesizing and incorporating public input

    • Become part of an interactive statewide network of natural resource professionals dedicated to facilitating natural resource conflicts in creative and collaborative ways

     

    How the program works:

    The program is divided into two sessions:

    March 2 - 3, 2015  & April 14-15, 2015

    Kettunen Center, 14901 4H Drive, Tustin, MI 49688

    Participants MUST be able to attend both sessions, as the second builds on the information and material introduced in the first session. This also enables participants to develop long-term professional relationships with each other across organizations and geographic locations.

     

    What are the fees?

    The program cost is $495, which includes food, lodging, and all program materials. Scholarships may be available based on demonstrated need.

     

    Contact Information:

    For additional information, contact Georgia Peterson at 517-335-7383 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

     

    Register here

    Seats are limited. Registration Deadline: February 16, 2015.

     

     

     

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